Majority of sub Saharan Africa did not have electricity in 2020

 Majority of sub Saharan Africa did not have electricity in 2020

Majority of sub Saharan Africa did not have electricity in 2020.

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About 790 million people worldwide did not have access to electricity in 2020, most of them  living  in  sub‐Saharan  Africa  and  developing  Asia a new energy report has said.

According to International Energy Agency(IEA) report entitled  Net Zero  by 2050 A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector around  2.6 billion  people  did  not  have  access to clean cooking options: 35% of them were in sub‐Saharan Africa, 25% in India and  15% in China.

A lack of access to energy not only impedes economic development, but also causes serious harm to health and is a barrier to progress on gender equality and education the report noted.

“In emerging market and developing economies, energy use increases by 50% to 2050, reflecting a tripling of economic output between 2020 and 2050,” IEA report has shown.

“Despite  the increase in GDP and energy use in emerging  market and developing economies, 750 million people still have no access  to electricity in  2050, more than 95% of them in sub‐Saharan Africa, and 1,5 billion people continue to rely  on the traditional use of bioenergy for cooking.”

IEA highlighted that in emerging market and developing economies, energy use increases by 50% to 2050, reflecting a tripling of economic output between 2020 and 2050.

 Despite  the increase in Gross Domestic Product and energy use in emerging  market and developing economies, 750 million people still have no access  to electricity in  2050, more than 95% of them in sub‐Saharan Africa, and 1,5 billion people continue to rely  on the traditional use of bioenergy for cooking.

The energy sector contains a large number of long‐lived and capital‐intensive assets.

Urban  infrastructure,  pipelines,  refineries,  coal‐fired  power  plants,  heavy  industrial  facilities,  buildings and large hydro power plants can have  technical and economic lifetimes of well  over 50 years.

“ If today’s energy infrastructure was to be operated until the end of the typical  lifetime  in  a  manner  similar  to  the  past,  we  estimate  that  this  would  lead  to  cumulative  energy‐related and industrial process CO2 emissions between 2020 and 2050 of just under  650 Gt CO2,” the report noted.

As  the  world  continues  to  grapple  with  the  impacts  of  the  Covid‐19  pandemic,  it  is  essential  that  the  resulting  wave  of  investment  and  spending  to  support  economic  recovery is aligned with the net zero pathway.

“Policies should be strengthened to speed  the deployment of clean and efficient energy technologies. Mandates and standards are vital  to  drive  consumer  spending  and  industry  investment  into  the  most  efficient technologies,” IEA said.

EIA said targets and competitive auctions can enable wind and solar to accelerate the electricity sector transition adding fossil fuel subsidy phase‐outs, carbon pricing and other market reforms can ensure appropriate price signals.

 “Policies  should  limit  or  provide  disincentives for the use of certain fuels and technologies, such as unabated coal‐fired  power  stations,  gas  boilers  and  conventional  internal  combustion  engine  vehicles. Governments  must  lead  the  planning  and  incentivising  of  the  massive  infrastructure  investment, including in smart transmission and distribution grids,” the report noted.

Fidelity Hamilton Mhlanga

Fidelity Hamilton Mhlanga has been writing finance and business news over the past 5 years. He earned a BSC in Media and Society Studies and Masters of Development Studies from Midlands State University, in Zimbabwe. He follows mining, insurance, banking and energy stories. He is passionate about development and growth.

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